Expect Referrals

3 Reasons to Expect Referrals From Your Patients

Expect Referrals

 

Imagine a time when therapists didn’t weren’t concerned about referrals.

There was a time not too long ago when all a therapist had to do was work hard at getting people better, develop relationships with a few referral sources and you’d be good to go.

Largely due to the explosions of provider networks every therapist is now an active participant in the creation of new referrals–whether we like it or not.

If you hear yourself saying, “I believe that you get referrals by doing great work not by asking for them” then I want to challenge your mindset for your own good. Good physical therapy is just the admission price. An extraordinary patient experience is what earns us referrals and grows our practices. 

It stands to reason that any patient who experiences an extraordinary outcome and level of service is far more likely to become a part of your referral network.

Remarkable therapists expect to receive referrals from every patient as a natural course of providing care. If fact, expert clinicians are convinced something went wrong when a patient doesn’t refer friends and family.

How about you, do you expect referrals from your patients?

KILLER MARKETING SECRETS FOR PRIVATE PRACTICE–CHAD MADDEN[ff#71]

How To Thrive in the New Healthcare Economy

 

chad madden interview

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What would you do if you lost your top referral source for the 3RD TIME because of a POPTS practice?

In 2010, Chad Madden PT experienced two therapists leave his private practice to open up their own practice. He had just lost $98,000 in one quarter in his business. He was, in his own words, feeling sorry for himself and playing the victim.

Instead of looking for solutions he was wallowing in his problems.

Then things changed for the better.

Chad went from being a PT victim to a PT allstar by following some very simple steps that he is going to share with us today. 

In Control Of Your Most Important Asset?

 

reputation

I want to you to ask yourself:

What are the three words you want to come after your name when people think of you?

I’m not talking about your professional credentials or certifications. I’m referring to the words that patients, colleagues and referral sources use to describe who you are and what you do.  I guarantee you they are putting labels and categories on you that greatly effect your professional success.

Many therapists believe that if they just improve their clinical knowledge and skills they’ll be recognized based upon the merits of their work. Their thinking goes something like this, if patients get better and I work really hard the rest will take care of itself.

Therapists often make the faulty assumption that if their professional reputation grows to a certain level, word of mouth marketing will fill their schedules. Once they become “good enough” their professional career will take off and they’ll be in high demand.

But that’s simply not reality anymore. Whether you want to be happier at your present job, make a job change or take the leap into private practice you have to make a name for yourself. To achieve success in today’s competitive market, it’s almost certain that you’ll need to develop your professional brand.

CREATE YOUR EXTRA-ORDINARY PROFESSIONAL BRAND- JASON TREU [[ff70]

jason treu

Too many therapists believe that if they just improve their clinical knowledge and skills they’ll be recognized based upon the merits of their work. Their thinking goes something like this, if

I work really hard and patients get better the rest will take care of itself. They think that their professional reputation and practice will grow as patients improve and begin telling their physicians and friends. Once they become good enough their professional career will take off and they’ll be in high demand.But that’s simply not reality anymore.

Whether you want to be happier at your present job, make a job change or take the leap into private practice you have to  to make a name for yourself. To achieve success in today’s competitive market, it’s almost certain that you’ll need to develop your professional brand.

We live in a busy world where it is becoming increasingly difficult to stand out from all the other practioners in the healthcare industry. Whether it’s developing an expert niche or attracting your ideal clients having a clear professional brand is vital.

You don’t have to be a genius or a worldwide therapy guru to make an impact. Applying simple branding principles based upon cultivating relationships within your inner circle.

HATE SELLING–TRY BEING ATTRACTIVE

apple waiting line-2

There’s no such thing as a business with nothing to sell. 

Historically, therapists have been lousy at selling. Most therapists have been insulated from market forces due to third party payers. Consumers relied on ‘someone else’ to pay the bills so therapists didn’t have to sell their value. Not anymore. If you want to stay competitive in the therapy business you’ll need to be able to sell.

But let’s be honest selling can be a pain in the gluteus maximus. It takes a lot of energy to keep going, especially if you’ve don’t have any training or previous experience. Most therapists avoid it like a chronic pain patient on late Friday afternoon. Many therapists dabble in it but give up because they don’t get as many referrals as they’d like for the effort invested.

Solving the Marketing Mystery- Brian Gallagher PT [ff68]

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BEN MUSCHOLT PT

Do you ever hear yourself saying, ” I wish I was taught this stuff in PT school”?

Many therapists find themselves at a loss when the conversation shifts to the business and marketing aspects of a therapy practice. The academic requirements to prepare therapy students for a entry level competence leaves little room for the economic side of healthcare.

Healthcare reform has increased scrutiny of the cost of care and value delivered. Therapists are being held accountable for their productivity and marketing their own practices.

Unfortunately, marketing remains a mystery to many therapists and something to avoid.

My guest today, Brian Gallagher will take some of the mystery out of marketing for you. Brian’s brings a wealth of experience with over 18 years of  proven success in private practice and providing coaching/consulting services in over 300 offices.

How to Grow Your Practice Without Being Pushy

boxing gloves

I want to talk about a dirty word that therapists tend to hate:

Marketing

If you’re like me, you’re probably overwhelmed by the ads that flood your email inbox, Pandora playlist and the movie trailers prior to the show you’ve paid to see.

Like many therapists, you might hear the word “marketing” and think of pushy sales people, cheesy ads, or sitting for hours in a physician’s waiting room. This isn’t the case though.

Sure, some small business owners take this approach to marketing, though few find great success from it. Marketing refers to all the efforts you take to connect your business with those in the community who can use your services. It can be so many things and none of them have to make you feel cheap or dishonest, in fact it shouldn’t.

Can a Niche Be Too Small? -Ben Musholt PT[ff67]

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BEN MUSCHOLT PT

Seth Godin, author and social media thought leader, says

“There’s no such thing as a niche that’s too small if people care enough. “

In today’s competitive healthcare marketplace it’s of vital importance that therapists don’t blend in but stand out. A clear professional brand is an important part of your success.

Your professional brand is far more than your logo, business cards or what your website looks like. It’s you–your assets, experience and personal interests.

It’s what makes you unique. It’s what you stand for and what makes you different from the rest.

Blending in and marketing yourself like other therapists can be alluring. Focusing on your specializations and the letters behind your name gives the illusion that it’s the professional way to go. But it won’t really be you and you won’t be able to fill your schedule with clients who love to work with you.

Today’s guest, Ben Musholt, has built an online platform and online business around one of his unique passions– Parkour.  The training program called Parkour uses movement to get participants from one point to another in the fastest way possible without assistive equipment. It involves running and jumping, vaulting over obstacles to name a few.

I interviewed Ben in podcast Episode #24 about his Beyond the Clinc in House Therapy Services. To learn more about Ben’s background and his day job I encourage you to listen to that episode. 

The Art of Attracting Patients

The Art of Attracting Patients

Cash Yoga Practice-Dr. Lisa Holland, Belly Guru- [FF66]

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BELLY GURU-CASH YOGA PRACTICEDR. LISA HOLLANDWWW.PAULPOTTERPT.COM

Looking for ways to make up for the money you’re not getting paid by insurance companies?

If you are, you’re not alone. Therapists are ideally positioned to offer medical fitness services because of their expertise in movement related problems and their indepth medical education. US consumers spend $267 billion dollars on health-related products and services. Consumer interest in fitness services, dietary supplements and weight loss programs has sky rocketed.

This Month’s Theme: Discovering Your Niche

We are highlighting the importance of being category authority in a area of practice that’s your passion.  I’m convinced that when you do your best work and help people along the way you’ll be the most successful and content. A niche is where your knowledge, clinical expertise and passion enhances your professional reputation and grow your practice.

Throughout the month I will produce blog posts, podcast episodes and free downloadable resources designed to help you become a category authority and build your practice.

In a competitive marketplace the benefits of standing out and being the best–no matter your profession– are rapidly increasing. The Internet has amplified the noise so to be heard above the crowd therapists need a strong clear message of who they are and the value they offer.